Monday, September 6, 2010

Road Trip 2010: Gearing Up at REI


After about a week in Utah, it was time to travel south and meet up with my backpacking friends in New Mexico.  I stopped at the REI in Albequerque to pick up a few items I decided I wanted.  I walked to the counter with 400 dollars in merchandise and the woman told me, "You need a membership."  Apparently I get a rebate once a year on my purchases and can also return anything for any reason for a full refund as a member.  

I finally got some trekking poles.  That's me using them in the Grand Canyon.  They make a huge difference in the amount of stress on my knees when I'm going downhill, and when I'm going uphill I can use my arms to help climb.  I love them.  I use them on all hikes now, even though I did get a few looks in the more crowded areas along the Rim Trail in the Grand Canyon.  Two different people asked if I was expecting snow.

I also bought a water filter and a stove.  I used the filter to pump water out of the lake.  It took less than 5 minutes to pump 3 liters and the water tasted very good.  You can drink it instantly instead of waiting hours for the tablets to work.  It's lighter and takes up less space than extra water, so I may be using it a lot.  The stove boils water in two minutes or less.  Everyone in my outdoor group seems to have a Jetboil.  I bought a purple one so I'd know which one was mine - and because I like purple.  They are much easier to use than any other stoves I've tried.  You don't even have to light a match - just attach the fuel can and push a button.     You can buy a pan that attaches, but I don't have one yet.  

I bought an extra Camelbak water bladder, some misc. small items, and way more dehydrated food than I needed.  Oh, well...we'll call it hurricane supplies.  The stove is also good for that.  One of the guys on the backpacking trip says if they issue a boil water warning after a storm, you can use the filter instead.  I don't know if that's true.        
     

17 comments:

Brian Miller said...

nice that water filter sounds like it rocks...never used hiking poles...hmmm...

jack69 said...

We cannot do without the poles. Of course we are cheap and use ski poles. We too have gotten strnage looks. We are fortunate to have the same filter and we love it. I like the stove. If we try to finish the AT I will try to pick one of those up. Looks like a good investment.
Sherry and I looked at those trekking poles four years ago and they were over a $100, you got a good deal on them.

Enjoy and good hiking. Good to see you out.
good shot of you and the canyon, seems you darken the face, right?

Love from Upper Utah, headed for the craters of the Moon. Idaho.

Lourie said...

Hmmmm trekking poles....I have bad knees...I will have to check these out.

Tempo said...

Love the new gear Jen, I'd like a pair of those poles. The water purifier is common here and you can use it to clean nearly anything... auto coolant, mud, even pee. (recycling gone a bit far) They say it removes virtually any nasty but you pay for it by having to replace the filters more often.

A Cuban In London said...

I love trekking. I did it a few times in Wales recently over the summer. That gear looks fantastic, especially the poles. They do make a difference and I might invest on a pair in the near future. Snow? What was that person thinking? :-)

Sorry to hear about your blog friend. You're right, we get attached to our cyber-mates.

Greetings from London.

....Petty Witter said...

Sounds so exciting, a real adventure.

blueviolet said...

The trekking poles are good warning for snakes too!

Amy said...

Oh wow great time spent in the out doors. I lived in New Mexico for a short time. I know where you were. Have a great day..

Vince said...

For someone not of the USA, I have some difficulty tying all the places together. I don't suppose you have the route drawn on a map.
And the poles are really good aren't they. And they help with your breathing for your hands are kept high.

Kelly said...

I think the trekking poles are a great idea! My husband has a huge walking stick someone carved for him that he uses when hunting/trapping. A great tool considering some of the terrain he has to navigate.

Heff said...

"Water bladder".

What a LOVELY term !

Sarah said...

Looks like you are PREPARED! How fun :)

ρομπερτ said...

Always a safe step ahead for you !

Jen said...

I do not have the route drawn on a map, but if I can figure out how to make one online, I'll post it here.

Jen said...

I called it a bladder, because that's what it is. I think the Camelbak people call it a reservoir or something so people feel better drinking from it. I think it's silly.

deb said...

I am just floored by your endeavours. And inspired.
My hubby and I always intend on doing more of this stuff... of course we keep waiting for more free time as the kids get older, but then so are we!

Heather said...

Trekking poles...interesting, I wonder if I could use those one my walks. The brain is curning! LOL!

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